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From the Dance Hall to the Honeymoon: the Story of a 1920s Bride

Updated: 3 days ago

July 15th, 1922 was the day we met. I was all dolled up and ready for a night out with the girls. I didn’t expect to meet the man of my dreams, but after he approached me in the dance hall, I couldn’t take my eyes off him. The way he smiled at me made me feel like I was the only girl in the world. Just when I was starting to wonder if I would see him again, he asked me out for the following weekend. I couldn’t help it- I was already smitten.



The bride slowly flips through the pages of her wedding diary as she sips her tea, reminiscing on her whirlwind romance. Two years ago, she met the man of her dreams, and today she will stand before close family and friends to marry him under a flowering gazebo. The chatter of excitement and busyness starts to rise in the background of the bride’s home as family and friends prepare for the event.


In the 1920s, keeping a wedding diary was a common tradition. It gave brides a place to share how they met their fiancés and describe their engagement. After they were married, they could write down all the stunning details of their wedding day and honeymoon. They could even paste pictures of the event if they were fortunate enough to have a photographer.


Unlike most modern weddings, weddings in the 1920s often took place around lunchtime or in the afternoon on a weekday. As a popular folk rhyme stated: “Marry on Monday for health, Tuesday for wealth, Wednesday the best day of all.” Today, weekdays are still a wonderful time for the wedding of your dreams.


A lunchtime wedding in the ‘20s was considered an extravagant affair since most receptions only included cake and punch. No matter what was served at the reception, however, the bride paid attention to each and every detail. She would choose a unique cake based on flavor instead of decor, but the cake would still look splendid.


Many receptions were simple but elegant. Though some did choose church or courthouse weddings, couples in the 1920s often got married at home, and little could compare to the beauty of a quaint, romantic backyard wedding.


The 1920s were a time of celebration and nothing was done halfway. At the end of the war in 1918, many women were reunited with their loves and desperate to start their lives together. Some lost their husbands in the war and were getting remarried. No matter what brought the bride to this significant day- every detail of the wedding made a statement- from her bouquet to her headdress. The bouquets were colorful and oversized to stand out as much as possible and the headdresses caught everyone’s attention when the bride walked into the room.


Some brides chose traditional white wedding dresses while others chose to stand out with a color other than white. Those who were getting married for the second time were sometimes even less traditional, choosing a party dress or adding a feather boa to their wedding day attire. Lower necklines on wedding dresses and intricate details such as beading grew in popularity.



Brides could purchase their dresses in a department store or visit one of the specialty bridal shops that were popping up all over. This particular bride chose a slip-lace dress with a sequinned headband. Different headpieces were common for brides in the 1920s and ranged from beaded headbands to cloche hats, depending on the style of the bride.


To prepare for the wedding ceremony and reception, family members would help as much as possible. Wedding photography was becoming popular as well during this time, although not every couple could afford it. Those who could afford it splurged to be able to look back on these moments for years to come.


As the afternoon quickly approaches, there's still plenty to do. The refreshments, music, and flowers must be perfect. The sound of a live jazz band will soon fill each room of the bride’s home, and she’ll clutch her bright, bold bouquet for most of the day.


Finally, it’s time for the wedding. The bride takes one final look in the mirror and adjusts her sparkling headband. Her bridesmaids are by her side in their white satin skirts. Her groom waits under the gazebo in a gold vest and matching bowtie. Both the bride and groom are ready to become one on the most important day of their lives.



Shortly after the wedding, the bride and groom will head off on their honeymoon. Honeymoons weren’t as exotic back then as they are in modern times. The couple would choose a place that was special to them where they could spend time together away from their home and families. It was the perfect way to start their new life together.


On the day of a 1920s wedding, every detail matters. From the hand-written place cards to the detailed entries in the bride's wedding diary. Many of these timeless traditions can make your modern wedding even more memorable.


Ready to plan your authentic style 1920’s wedding at a historic venue in Texas? Olde House would love to be a part of it. Book now!


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